Hope for logos – HOPE International

hope_logo_horiz_color

Some logos have such clarity and uniqueness that they inspire hope for the future of graphic design. Coincidentally, the organization HOPE International has one of these logos.

HOPE International seeks to see people around the world living in poverty become capable of providing for their families and communities. On HOPE’s mission page they display their mission, method and motivation. They describe that their mission is:

“To invest in the dreams of families in the world’s underserved communities as we proclaim and live the Gospel.” 

What I find makes HOPE unique involves its combination of providing help through financial training and a Christ-centered motive. They restore dignity to people by assisting them in developing the skills needed to earn their own income instead of just providing aid. This training also has the major component of sharing the hope of Christ.

I had the opportunity to attend a breakfast held by HOPE a few months ago and heard President & CEO, Peter Greer, talk about the importance of balancing the components of Christian teaching and financial services. There have been organizations that have approached him about interest in partnering with HOPE but did not want to recognize the Christian aspect of the company. This organization does not have an easy task to blend two missions that have often been in conflict in our society.

That challenge makes the success of HOPE’s logo incredibly impressive. The financial strategy reveals itself through the mark that includes two arrows that curve towards one another, representing the cycle of giving so that those they help have the ability to give back. The thin and clean lines of the mark and the font choice also provide a sense of order and trustworthiness, crucial of an organization that needs to communicate to donors that it will be using their finances responsibly.

This logo also communicates the Christian hope that they provide. Like the logo for Amazima Ministries that I wrote about last week, HOPE’s logo does not use traditional Christian symbols but instead implies the Christian hope. The way that the arrows curve to form a circle with thin lines circling it creates a clever image of a sun symbolizing bright futures. Also, how that the sunray in the 3’oclock position relates to the capital “H” in HOPE adds sophistication and connection to the font of the logo.

A final significant element of this logo involves the color choice. This company could have chosen green to make their financial mission instantly apparent. Their choice of yellow however, makes a different statement and speaks to their message of hopefulness.

I found an interesting article posted by Fast Company that explores the psychology behind different colors in American culture. HOPE’s chosen color of yellow represents optimism and shows clarity when used in marketing. Even though yellow does not associate with American currency, our perceptions of the color align with the message of this organization.

HOPE International did not have a simple task in creating a logo for their unique brand. But it has succeeded in using graphic design to convey their point of view. Their ability to clearly portray a distinctive message shows the astounding capability of graphic design to communicate meaning.

Learn more about HOPE International through:

Website: http://www.hopeinternational.org

Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/hopeintl/

Twitter: https://twitter.com/HOPEtweets

Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/hope_intl/

Blog: http://blog.hopeinternational.org

Resources used:

https://www.fastcompany.com/3028378/leadership-now/what-your-logos-color-says-about-your-company-infographic

http://www.hopeinternational.org/what-we-do

http://www.hopeinternational.org/about-us/our-mission

 

 

 

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